Sonntag, 5. April 2020

Erfolg bei Vorwahlen in New Hampshire Warum Trump und Sanders für die US-Mittelschicht sprechen

Vorneweg: Hillary Clinton, hier mit Ehemann Bill, gilt weiterhin als Favoritin im US-Präsidentschaftswahlkampf.
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Vorneweg: Hillary Clinton, hier mit Ehemann Bill, gilt weiterhin als Favoritin im US-Präsidentschaftswahlkampf.

2. Teil: Der Verlust der Fairness in den USA

First, by resorting to harmless sounding terms, the mega-rich and their Lobbyist do their utmost to deliberately obscure the tools they use to achieve their own goals.

This evidently includes increasing the already vast levels of income inequality in the United States even more. The overriding goal seems to be for the U.S. not to be beaten by China as the country with the highest level of income inequality.

Bernie Sanders (Demokraten) samt Fans.
Second, and even more troubling, is the fact that American democracy has proven itself incapable of righting the obvious wrongs of these tax privileges of which the rich avail themselves, even as they materially disadvantage the remaining 99% of society.

Defending a basic amount of social fairness against the interests of the mega-rich is no exercise in "populism."

In any other country, the process of making sure that a small group at the top of the income scale do not rig tax laws excessively in their own favor is called democracy.

What Bernie Sanders stands up for goes well beyond the interests of the working class: He stands up for basic fairness for the middle class.

Sanders may call himself a "democratic socialist." In most other Western countries, he would be nothing more than a common-sense, middle-of-the-road politician.

He doesn't preach socialism, never mind true revolution. He just wants to put an end to an America where the mega-rich have the entire political game rigged to their advantage.

With the campaign finance laws as influential as they are to the other people he would need to work with for change, his effort is a long shot, even if he wins the presidency.

Money will still rule the political game in the United States of America, in a manner unseen in other developed countries for over a century and a half.

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